Wednesday, May 14, 2008

PCOS Research Gets A Boost

The National Institutes of Health has awarded a grant to the Virgina Commonwealth School of Medicine to study PCOS in an interdisciplinary setting.

The five-year grant will support an interdisciplinary and translational research center in PCOS, making VCU one of only15 Specialized Cooperative Centers Program in Reproduction and Infertility Research (SCCPRIR) in the country.

“This research program initiative expands the existing PCOS program at VCU, allowing interdisciplinary and collaborative studies with partnering institutions, and will enhance our ability to bring research discoveries from the laboratory bench quickly to the clinical care of women with PCOS,” said John Nestler, M.D., vice chair of the Department of Internal Medicine and chair of the Division of Endocrinology and Metabolism at the VCU School of Medicine. Nestler, a pioneer in PCOS research, is the primary investigator for the project.

“VCU’s SCCPRIR program focuses on the use of genetics to identify risk for PCOS in an individual woman and pharmacogenomics, designed to identify the optimal treatment for an individual patient,” he said.

The SCCPRIR is administered by the Reproductive Sciences Branch of the NICHD, and provides funding for a limited number of research centers in the reproductive sciences. The purpose of these centers is to provide an arena for multidisciplinary interactions among basic and clinical scientists interested in establishing high-quality programs in reproduction and infertility research. The centers also serve as national resources for the training and career development of new scientists electing to pursue research in high priority areas of reproduction and infertility research.

Another good vote for the good fight.

1 comments:

Jeffrey Dach MD said...



PCOS, the Hidden Epidemic

The fundamental problem with PCOS is anovulation and not making progesterone for two weeks every cycle.

This lack of progesterone leads to hormonal imbalance in the ovary, causes the ovary to produce testosterone and leads to the irregular menstrual cycles and infertility. This is aggravated by obesity and insulin resistance.

Progesterone is missing, therefore replacing it makes sense.

To read more, click here:

Understanding PCOS, the Hidden Epidemic by Jeffrey Dach MD

Jeffrey Dach MD
4700 Sheridan Suite T
Hollywood Fl 33021
954-983-1443
my web site